>Late start

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My sister talked me out of the Birmingham run today, saying (quite rightly) that it would be better to still aim at Saturday and get my dinner thrown in than struggle down today and find it would still be okay in 3 days time (or better). She said if the weather and roads were really bad, then yes, I could go down next week when it clears, I can run my visitor home at the same time, and we’d just postpone Christmas.
I did everything yesterday that I planned to do, plus the work’s cards, and had 3 books arrive before heading off. I’m still missing the book I want before my workshop starts on 3 January, but with these and all the lovely e-books I’ve downloaded to my phone, if I do get snowed in somewhere – anywhere – at least I have plenty to read.

The shopping took up all afternoon and some of the evening, and after 2 supermarkets and the entire gift shopping (apart from a few stocking fillers I already had) I was shattered when I got in. My tea came from the hot deli at Tesco and I did nothing all evening (although I did deliver the neighbours’ cards). Not even my writing exercise, but that’s the first one I’ve skipped. I’ll do it later.

Holly kept me up for most of the night wondering whether or not she wanted to go out or use the litter, then deciding she’d do neither and was quite happy to bounce around the house away from my grasp. In the end I shoved her out, but then lay awake worrying that she may freeze to death if she came to the door and I didn’t hear her. She came in at 5am, but that meant a disturbed night on top of a busy day, which resulted in a lie in … and a very late start today.

First job is the activity annual. I want to shift that today and I promised them it would be today. Then it will be wrapping presents.

Speaking of supermarkets, one story on the news that grabbed my attention this morning was the number of supermarkets being given permission to build new stores across the country and the resulting demise of the High Street. Well, here’s a curve ball for you:

What if one of the supermarket chains, such as Morrison’s, bought up a derelict High Street and filled every unit with a dedicated shop? Here’s an extract from a Facebook “conversation” I’ve already had.

Diane: Why doesn’t, say, Morrison’s buy up a derelict High Street? Could fill each unit with a “shop”.

Facebook friend: Brilliant idea! But it’s the car parking that’s the big advantage for the supermarket model. I sometimes look at run down beautiful old buildings (I like beautiful old buildings) and think ‘sell it to MacDonald’s for a quid’ with heavy cont
ract clauses that say they have to restore and maintain the fabric of the building. Companies like that could be persuaded to some social responsibility I think. The Odeon in Bradford is a case in point. The alternative is it’ll be knocked down and some faceless glass cube put there in its place!

Diane: At the back of almost every single row of shops that I know of is car parking, but people don’t use it because there are council charges and nowhere to go while they’re paying for the car park. No security either. I’ve seen some mini-markets take advantage of this, notably the freezer centres. And where they still charge you get it back on your shopping. Surely it would be cheaper for a chain to take advantage of buildings and facilities already there than buy land and build hypermarkets on the edges of towns that no-one can get to when it snows …

Facebook friend: Absolutely Diane. The whole thing’s skewed. And Morrison’s might be the ones who can see the sense in your idea, given they were born out of a market stall. Not so long ago too!

Diane: Do they have a suggestion box?

So come on, Morrison’s, how about it? (Might send them a link …)

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2 thoughts on “>Late start

  1. >Write their CEO with a solid proposal. If they came in as an investor in Mom & Pop shops instead of just trying to destroy them, it would set a good business model and be good PR.Careful driving!

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