Walk: TPT Thurgoland

We are very fortunate to be living right next to the Trans Pennine Trail, a national route that runs from coast to coast and up and down a bit.

I’ve been walking the dog up towards where our path joins the trail, but I’ve been turning around at 15 minutes as I’m trying to gradually build up stamina and fitness.

The driveway to the farm upon which is our house, alongside the River Don. (Picture: Ian Wordsworth)

During the last bank holiday weekend, we finally did a full circuit of the smallest circular section, and we were surprised at how quickly we did it.

We already have a fairly good walk from the farm to the road, but we don’t stay on the road for long. We just cross the River Don and then turn up onto a farm track that’s subsequently crossed by the TPT.

The farm track up to the TPT from our driveway. (Picture: Ian Wordsworth)

At the top of the track you can see in the picture above, the TPT crosses both ways. We turned left and went behind that farm you can see.

From the TPT we had a very good view of the ground-art recently installed for the Tour de Yorkshire cycle race, which went past the end of our driveway.

Ground-art for the recent Tour de Yorkshire race, which went past the end of our driveway. (Picture: Ian Wordsworth)

There were a few pleasure cyclists on our route, some of whom you can just see (in red) in the picture below. These weren’t taking part in the race.

There were also a few pedestrians, but this was a “busy” day in our neck of the woods.

The Trans Pennine Trail. (Picture: Ian Wordsworth)

From the viaduct there are some great views, including the one below towards Penistone.

In the far distance you might just be able to see a field filled with cars, to the immediate left of that sticky-up thing. This field is usually green and empty – the cars were here for the cycle race.

Up on the hill you can just see cars parked. These were here for the Tour de Yorkshire. (Picture: Ian Wordsworth)

The picture below is one of my favourites, as you can see our house and, hopefully, the reason we chose to live there. It really is a beautiful, peaceful setting, and it really is some distance from any roads.

That’s our house in the centre of the picture, with the cream walls. We could see this from the viaduct too.

Our house nestled in our valley (centre of pic), from the TPT. (Picture: Ian Wordsworth)

Because it’s an old railway line, there’s a tunnel on this section of the route that we haven’t explored yet, but I think my sister did last year when she was house-sitting for us.

Instead, we left the TPT down a small path that goes downhill towards the river again. From this path there are some good views of the viaduct.

The TPT goes over this viaduct now, but it used to be a railway line. (Picture: Ian Wordsworth)

Then we were beside the river again, at the place where the poet usually gets in to go fluff-chucking (fly-fishing).

Apparently, the River Don is one of the fastest rising and the fastest dropping rivers in Europe. This is why we have flash floods along the driveway and in the surrounding roads.

Isn’t it pretty?

The River Don. (Picture: Ian Wordsworth)

At the end of our walk we returned across the main field that has a few young cows and two horses in it in this picture below. But until just a week or so ago, it was full of expectant sheep. That’s our house again, with the cream walls. The farm buildings are just below it to the left.

This circular walk is about 1.6 miles long. It took us 50 minutes as the poet kept stopping to take pictures, but I’ve done it since with just the dog, and it’s about 40 – 45 minutes.

Enjoy the pictures!

Heading back home, beside the River Don. That’s our house across the field, with the farmhouse and outbuildings to the left. (Picture: Ian Wordsworth)